Media Resources: Company Info, Press Coverage and more



Behavioral Economics, Patient Engagement and Thought leadership in the press



Wed Mar 21, 2018

How to put behavioral economics to work for more effective patient engagement

“Fitbits and pedometers don’t make you walk more,” said Asch. “Weight loss apps don’t make you lose weight. They’re just facilitators. Unless they’re paired with some insight into human behavior, they’re the sound of one hand clapping.”

Thu Mar 8, 2018

Taking steps to improve activity-tracking results

People don’t use activity trackers as much as prior surveys indicate. Incenting people to do the right thing has always been a challenge. David Asch and Mitesh Patel discuss ways in which personalization, behavioral economics and gamification can perhaps be used to nudge individuals to pay more attention to their health.

Wed Mar 7, 2018

Innovation is much more than just using new tech

David Asch, MD keynoted the HIMSS ‘19 Digital and Personal Connected Health Conference. Key quotes included - “Innovation is like research. It’s hypothesis-driven, it’s falsifiable and it’s highly disciplined.” “Often we are solving for the wrong problem, and if we solved for the right problem we might be in a better position to address our customers’ needs”.

Wed Feb 21, 2018

How Trump’s behind-the-scenes cuts to Medicare spending will hurt health care

Medicare spending accounted for 15% of federal spending in 2016. It is projected to reach 17.5% of federal spending by 2027. If we are to slow the rate of growth in Medicare spending over the longer term, it will likely require some unpopular limits on beneficiary access, convenience, and generosity of coverage.

Wed Jan 31, 2018

Want To Prevent Heart Attacks? Perhaps Don't Try This Behavioral Economics Intervention

Highlights the importance of also sharing the losses along with the wins - “In large part, I am happy because it got published in a leading medical journal: JAMA Internal Medicine. Kudos to the editors for publishing a “failed” trial. Trust me, there’s no failure in doing good science. The real failure would have been to allow this important study to go unpublished because the intervention didn’t work”.

Sun Jan 28, 2018

END OF WATCH: What happens when you try to change behavior without behavioral science?

But there aren’t a lot of fitness trackers infused with legitimate behavioral science, says Patel. While plenty of apps use gamification strategies, those strategies tend to be ill-conceived, based on standard economics and the idea that people are rational. “They think about all the different possibilities, and ‘How much will this cake or this gym workout add to my overall life,’ and then make a decision,” Patel says. “But we know people don’t do that.”

Mon Jan 22, 2018

Analyzing behavioral economics and psychology are key to engaging patients to make meaningful changes

“Fitbits and pedometers don’t make you walk more,” said Asch. “Weight loss apps don’t make you lose weight. They’re just facilitators. Unless they’re paired with some insight into human behavior, they’re the sound of one hand clapping.”

Thu Jan 18, 2018

Nudge Units to Improve the Delivery of Health Care

Opportunities for effective nudges abound in health care because choice architectures guide our behavior whether we know it or not. As more health care decisions are made within digital environments where they can be witnessed and their context can easily be reshaped, nudging opportunities expand. It doesn’t take much investment to support such expertise, and given the value of its applications, most health systems would be well served by insourcing it. We owe it to our patients to do the same for health care.

Thu Nov 16, 2017

Commentary: How Can We Help People Quit Smoking? Pay Them.

Anti-smoking advocates need to disseminate advice about effective behavior change strategies and encourage health plan benefit designs that invest in preventing disease, as opposed to simply treating the health consequences of smoking.

Mon Nov 13, 2017

How to Reduce Primary Care Doctors’ Workloads While Improving Care

A vision for the future casts the visit to the primary care doctor not as the solution but as a kind of failure—an inability to accommodate patient needs by any of the less-expensive levels of support.