Way to Be Active - UPHS

Compare the effectiveness of different combinations of social comparison feedback and financial incentives to increase physical activity.

Mitesh S. Patel, MD, MBA, MS
Principal Investigator
Kevin G. Volpp, MD, PhD
Investigator

##Aim To compare the effectiveness of different combinations of social comparison feedback and financial incentives to increase physical activity.

Intervention and Design:

Two hundred eighty-six adults enrolled in the randomized trial.

Intervention - Twenty-six weeks of weekly feedback on team performance compared to the 50th percentile (n = 100) or the 75th percentile (n = 64) and 13 weeks of weekly lottery-based financial incentive plus feedback on team performance compared to the 50th percentile (n = 80) or the 75th percentile (n = 44) followed by 13 weeks of only performance feedback.

Main Measures - Mean proportion of participant-days achieving the 7000-step goal during the 13-week intervention.

Way to Health Use

  • Study Enrollment: Enroll and randomize participants in the study

  • Device Integration: Collect step data from participants’ devices

  • Lottery: Financial incentives based on lottery win for participants

Findings and Conclusions

Compared to the 75th percentile without incentives during the intervention period, the mean proportion achieving the 7000-step goal was significantly greater for the 50th percentile with incentives group (0.45 vs 0.27, difference: 0.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.04 to 0.32; P = .012) but not for the 75th percentile with incentives group (0.38 vs 0.27, difference: 0.11, 95% CI: −0.05 to 0.27; P = .19) or the 50th percentile without incentives group (0.30 vs 0.27, difference: 0.03, 95% CI: −0.10 to 0.16; P = .67).

Social comparison to the 50th percentile with financial incentives was most effective for increasing physical activity.

Publications


A Randomized Trial of Social Comparison Feedback and Financial Incentives to Increase Physical Activity