Way to Health

Be In Control

Effectiveness of daily financial incentives on glucose monitoring adherence and glycemic control in adolescents & young adults with type 1 diabetes.

Nov 27, 2017

Charlene Wong, MD, MSHP Charlene Wong, MD, MSHP
Alexander Morris, BS Alexander Morris, BS

The Challenge

Glycemic control often deteriorates during adolescence and the transition to young adulthood for patients with type 1 diabetes. The inability to manage type 1 diabetes effectively during these years is associated with poor glycemic control and complications from diabetes in adult life.

The Approach / Study Overview

Objective was to determine the effect of daily financial incentives on glucose monitoring adherence and glycemic control in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. All participants were given daily blood glucose monitoring goals of 4 or more checks per day with 1 or more level within the goal range (70-180 mg/dL) collected with a wireless glucometer. The 3-month intervention consisted of a $60 monthly incentive in a virtual account, from which $2 was subtracted for every day of non-adherence to the monitoring goals. During a 3-month follow-up period, the intervention was discontinued.

The primary outcome was change in HbA1c levels at 3 months. Secondary outcomes included adherence to glucose monitoring and change in HbA1c levels at 6 months. All analyses were by intention to treat.

Way to Health Use

Results / Outcomes

Effectiveness of financial incentives:This area shows promise in the adolescent population which has been traditionally difficult to target.

Improved glucose monitoring: from 18.9% to 50% vs control group

Publications and Press

  • Effect of Financial Incentives on Glucose Monitoring Adherence and Glycemic Control Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes